How Will the SSA Decide Whether My Skills Are Transferable? Transferable skills are a vital part of the job market. They are those skill sets that enable people to find new jobs, and even switch careers. They’re what enable you to thrive in the job market. They can also, however, get in the way when you’re trying to collect social security disability benefits after a serious injury. Learn why some skills are considered to be transferable, how that can impact your claim for SSDI benefits, and how a social security attorney can help. Transferable Skills and SSDI In general, if your disability arises from work that is considered “unskilled labor,” your skills won’t generally be found to be transferable, nor get in the way of an SSDI claim. However, if you worked in a job involving skills that took three months or more to learn, you may run into problems. The key factor is whether the SSA determines your skills will adapt you to another line of work, or whether you have the ability to adapt to a less stressful line of work. Age and Transferable Skills The Social Security Administration uses a set of rules called “Grid Rules” to determine whether applicants qualify as disabled under the law. These rules fall along a grid of medical and vocational qualifications, and part of this grid is whether or not you’ve learned skills that could transfer to another line of work. For applicants who are under the age of 50 or don’t otherwise fit into the grid, the SSA determines whether there are other jobs that you are capable of doing. What Skills are Transferable? Skill “transferability” refers to the ability to apply skills learned in one job to another. There are a broad range of skills that the SSA might find transferable, but just a few common examples include: - Management and supervisory skills - Skills as a teacher or educator - Manufacturing and assembly skills - Use of construction vehicles and heavy equipment - Inventory, accounting, money management and bookkeeping - Typing, filing, organization and other clerical skills Factors in Transferability There are a number of factors that go into determining the transferability of skills. These include things such as your age, your level of training and aptitude in an individual skill, and any medical issues that might stop you from performing said skills. For example, if you suffer a traumatic brain injury that causes severe nerve damage, tremors or even a loss of IQ, your ability to use certain skills may be dramatically reduced. Hiring a Social Security Attorney Many people have filed for social security benefits over the years and been denied. It’s a frustrating experience to say the least, but it’s not the end of the world. Denied claims can be challenged to a positive result, but doing so requires experienced and knowledgeable assistance from a qualified Social Security Attorney. If you’ve been denied social security benefits based on a claim of transferable skills, you don’t have to quietly accept it and you don’t have to be alone. Call Dr. Mike LaTour for a case evaluation and to discuss your options today.

How Will the SSA Decide Whether My Skills Are Transferable?

Transferable skills are a vital part of the job market. They are those skill sets that enable people to find new jobs, and even switch careers. They’re what enable you to thrive in the job market. They can also, however, get in the way when you’re trying to collect social security disability benefits after a serious injury. Learn why some skills are considered to be transferable, how that can impact your claim for SSDI benefits, and how a social security attorney can help.

Transferable Skills and SSDI

In general, if your disability arises from work that is considered “unskilled labor,” your skills won’t generally be found to be transferable, nor get in the way of an SSDI claim. However, if you worked in a job involving skills that took three months or more to learn, you may run into problems. The key factor is whether the SSA determines your skills will adapt you to another line of work, or whether you have the ability to adapt to a less stressful line of work.

Age and Transferable Skills

The Social Security Administration uses a set of rules called “Grid Rules” to determine whether applicants qualify as disabled under the law. These rules fall along a grid of medical and vocational qualifications, and part of this grid is whether or not you’ve learned skills that could transfer to another line of work. For applicants who are under the age of 50 or don’t otherwise fit into the grid, the SSA determines whether there are other jobs that you are capable of doing.

What Skills are Transferable?

Skill “transferability” refers to the ability to apply skills learned in one job to another. There are a broad range of skills that the SSA might find transferable, but just a few common examples include:

         Management and supervisory skills

         Skills as a teacher or educator

         Manufacturing and assembly skills

         Use of construction vehicles and heavy equipment

         Inventory, accounting, money management and bookkeeping

         Typing, filing, organization and other clerical skills

Factors in Transferability

There are a number of factors that go into determining the transferability of skills. These include things such as your age, your level of training and aptitude in an individual skill and any medical issues that might stop you from performing said skills. For example, if you suffer a traumatic brain injury that causes severe nerve damage, tremors or even a loss of IQ, your ability to use certain skills may be dramatically reduced.

Hiring a Social Security Attorney

Many people have filed for social security benefits over the years and been denied. It’s a frustrating experience, to say the least, but it’s not the end of the world. Denied claims can be challenged to a positive result, but doing so requires experienced and knowledgeable assistance from a qualified Social Security Attorney. If you’ve been denied social security benefits based on a claim of transferable skills, you don’t have to quietly accept it and you don’t have to be alone. Call Dr. Mike LaTour for a case evaluation and to discuss your options today.

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