FAQ – About Social Security

Common Questions

Q. Is a Person Eligible for SSI and SSDI?

A. Yes if you meet the requirements established by the Social Security Administration for both programs.

Q.Why Does the Commercial Say I Can Receive Ssi and Disability?

A. You can if Social Security determines that you meet the requirements for either one or both.

Q.Why Does My Spouse’s Income Matter If We Are Getting Divorced and He or She Doesn’t Give Me Any Money or Support?

A. As long as you are legally married their income is counted. It is a matter of law and not an appealable issue.

Q. My Spouse Works and I Cannot Receive Benefits.

A. If Social Security has denied you because of your spouse’s income that means you have too many resources or assets and too much income into your household. That is a matter of law and not an appealable issue.Q. How difficult is it to obtain SSDI and/or SSI benefits?

B. It can be very difficult because the government has strict guidelines on what it considers to be a “disability.” Your injuries must be serious and you need detailed medical records to support your claim.

Q. I Am Already Receiving Disability Benefits but Can I Get More Money?

A. NO. Social Security determines how much an individual’s benefits are based on your prior earnings and taxes paid into the Social Security system while you were a worker. It is not an appealable issue.

Q. How Much Will I Receive a Month If I Am Approved?

A. Your benefits are determined by Social Security and are based on the amount of all of your prior earnings and the amount paid into the Social Security system while you were a worker. You can obtain that information by using the internet and signing into SSA.GOV and searching for your Earnings Record.

Q.How Much Money Can I Have in the Bank?

A. For SSI purposes you may have no more than $2,000 as an individual. If you have a spouse you may have no more than $3,000 in the bank. For SSDI there is no limit.

Q. How Many Work Credits Do I Need?

A. You need 20 credits out of the last 40 [5 years out of the last 10 years.]

Q. Does SSI Pay More than SSDI?

A. No. SSI is only supplemental to your SSDI and that amount is determined by Social Security.

Q. If I Owe Child Support Can I Still Receive SSI or SSDI

A. It’s possible but there are many factors involved and we can’t make that determination.

Q. If I Already Receive Ssi Can I Receive Ssdi as Well?

A. No. When you applied for SSI your claim was screened by Social Security to determine your eligibility for SSDI.

Q.Your Commercial Says I Can Receive SSI and SSDI – Why Can’t You Help Me?

A. We can help you receive SSDI and SSI if Social Security determines that you are eligible for both programs when we submit an application. If you do not meet the non-disability requirements there is no appealable issue.

Q. What Is the Difference Between SSDI and SSI?

A. SSDI is disability insurance you earned as a worker when you paid taxes into the federal system. SSI is provided by the federal government and supplements your SSDI amount to bring your income to the current minimum standard established by the government.

Q. Why Can’t You Help Me?

A. We can’t help you if your claim involves Non-Disability issues such as an overpayment, excess income, assets or resources, certain types of cessation of benefits, or offsets to your SSDI by other disability programs such as Workers’ Compensation.

Q. Why Don’t You Explain in the Commercial If You Can’t Help

A. There are many reasons why we may not be able to help you. We need to review your information before we make a decision.

Q. I Became a Resident of the Us in 1997. Can I Apply for Ssa Disability?

A. No. You must be a resident of the U.S. before 1996.

Q. Can I Get Disability If I Have a Learning Disability?

A. Possibly. We must review all of your impairments to determine the severity of your condition and review your medical and school records.

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