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If you’re facing the unexpected end of your SSDI benefits, you are far from alone. It happens to too many people every year. There are a number of reasons why this might happen—either your medical condition improves, your living situation changes, you start working again, or a number of other things cause your situation to switch.

If you’re facing this kind of benefits stoppage, you need the right kind of knowledge and help to get the compensation you need coming through once more. Learn what happens when your benefits from social security disability stop, and how you can fight to have the compensation you desperately need, reinstated.

When Social Security Disability Stops

When you are disabled, SSDI can be a lifeline that will keep you afloat while you try to keep your head above water. When your medical status improves even a little, you return to work, you reach retirement age, or a range of other life issues crops up, you might find that your benefits from social security disability stop.

Returning to Work

Social Security benefits are only given if you are unable to work due to the impairments you suffer from your disability. If you work while receiving benefits, this can obviously raise red flags that can lead to the termination of benefits. You are, however, permitted to work for a nine-month trial period spread over a 60 month period total, to see if you’re capable of work, and still draw benefits.

This work period is triggered if you earn more than $840. If your income and/or your assets exceed the eligibility thresholds for SSI, which is $735 per month income or $2,000 in assets, you may lose your benefits. But over half your earned wages are ignored when counting this income. It can get rather complicated.

Medical Condition Improvement

If your health improves to the point where you can go back to work, your benefits can be terminated. This factor is determined based on a Continuing Disability Review, or CDR. If you’re selected for CDR, the SSA will let you know in the mail. You’ll need to provide information about daily activities, and medical records.

A claims examiner will look everything over and determine whether or not your condition has improved to where you can work once more. At this point, the SSA can approve the continuance of benefits or deny them.

Other Conditions

Other conditions can stop benefits as well. These include having a minor disabled child who becomes 18, you reach full retirement age, the beneficiary dies, or there are other significant living changes.

Appealing a Denial

If your case is being reviewed or you’ve faced a Social Security disability stop, call on an experienced social security disability attorney like Dr. Bill LaTour. Dr. LaTour is well acquainted with the intricacies of Social Security Disability law, and he can help you fight for the compensation you deserve. SSDI is intended to help people who are unable to work due to a disability, and many innocent people are denied benefits every year. If this is you, call Dr. LaTour for a consultation about your case today.